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“The first time I tried it was in junior year of college.  I...

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“The first time I tried it was in junior year of college.  I bought it from some guy in the library.  I was in acting school, and there was so much pressure put on our senior year showcase.  The pill gave me so much energy.  I remember making a seven-page spreadsheet of all the agents in New York, including their address, specialty, and preferred method of contact.  Adderall gave me an ‘in’ to caring.    It’s so hard to be an actor in New York.  You have to want it so badly.  But I’d always struggled with depression and lack of motivation.  I thought I’d finally found the solution.  I just went to the psychiatrist and told them I needed a prescription.  It was so easy to get.  It went from every week, to every other day, to every day.  I built my life around it.  It got to the point where I’d never leave the house or coffee shop.  I wasn’t even getting real work done.  I was just doing random shit.  I’d write songs, tinker with my website, and send random messages to people I hardly knew.  I wasn’t sleeping.  I hardly ate.  And the moment I stopped taking the pill, I’d feel disgusting.  I was destroying my body.  But the thing about Adderall is,  if you don’t tell anyone, nobody really knows.  From the outside it just looks like you’re motivated and working hard.  But you’re horribly addicted.  You look like you.  But it’s not really you.”

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samuel
17 days ago
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Lessons from adderall.
The Haight in San Francisco
bjtitus
2 days ago
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Denver, CO
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satadru
17 days ago
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1. The addiction profile of the amphetamines in Adderall is basically equivalent to that of "meth"(amphetamine.)

2. The dosages in prescribed amphetamines are orders of magnitude smaller than that from using street versions of the same. (Crystal Meth/Ice/etc.)

3. Stimulants like Adderall (and also methamphetamine which can also be prescribed for ADHD refractory to other stimulants) are FIRST LINE for ADHD. Nothing has been shown to work better. Nothing. Non-stimulant drugs for ADHD such as atomoxetine which have a different mechanism of action (and aren't necessarily addictive) just don't appear to work as well.

4. If someone who is bipolar starts taking stimulants, they could be shifted over into mania... so it is important to consult with a psychiatrist if you're having depressive symptoms to make sure you're put on the right medication, where for instance a mood stabilizer might be more appropriate.

5. This shouldn't be construed as medical advice. Go see a doctor who will take you on as a patient if you have more questions about this stuff.
New York, NY

MeFi: Unendowed with wealth or pity

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@girlziplocked asks, "What's a dirty secret that everybody in your industry knows about but anyone outside of your line of work would be scandalized to hear?" Twitter responds with dozens of reports of systemic fraud, abuse, prejudice, corruption, incompetence, and precarity from restaurants, heavy industry, non-profits, technology, theatre, shipping, customer service, flower arranging, medicine, law, art, education, government, senior care, agriculture, telecommunications, and virtually every other sphere of modern economic activity.

Apt commentary from @trash_fire:
if you read that "secrets of industry" thread you'll learn that class advancement is the biggest scam going

people are brought up to believe that they can do a variety of interesting things, but the reality is that those positions are already captured by a very small aristocratic class

then these people are forced into peonage by the same class, because they attempted to get close to them/ their traditional careers

this isn't to say it's impossible to make at, just that it's impossible to be an Artist unless you have wealth

the same thing goes for other careers that would traditionally lead to an upper middle class lifestyle, actually-- lawyer, doctor, etc

The salaries are lower than they used to be or the credentialing process is so long and expensive that it hollows out the career path

@girlziplocked's current pinned tweet is a quote from Kurt Vonnegut's God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater:
Thus did a handful of rapacious citizens come to control all that was worth controlling in America. Thus was the savage and stupid and entirely inappropriate and unnecessary and humorless American class system created. Honest, industrious, peaceful citizens were classed as bloodsuckers, if they asked to be paid a living wage. And they saw that praise was reserved henceforth for those who devised means of getting paid enormously for committing crimes against which no laws had been passed. Thus the American dream turned belly up, turned green, bobbed to the scummy surface of cupidity unlimited, filled with gas, went bang in the noonday sun.
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jlvanderzwan
1 day ago
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bjtitus
2 days ago
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Denver, CO
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Denver is suing drug companies to help pay for the effects of the opioid crisis

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By moving forward with a safe drug use site last year, Denver officials made clear their intentions to treat people addicted to opioids as patients, not criminals. Now the city is suing 20 drug companies for aggressively pushing prescription drugs onto the market and downplaying their risks to public health.

The complaint alleges civil conspiracy, fraud and deceit, unjust enrichment, gross negligence, and causing a public nuisance. It also claims that the pharmaceutical companies violated the Colorado Consumer Protection Act and the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. Johnson & Johnson is the most recognizable defendant (a full list is at the bottom of this article).

“These companies knew better, and they still allowed the devastation to occur in our communities, and communities across the United States,” Denver Mayor Michael Hancock said in a statement. “This crisis could have and should have been avoided. So, we’re using every legal tool available to hold opioid manufacturers and distributors liable for the social and economic devastation their actions have caused in our cities, our counties and to our people.”

Between 2008 and 2017, opioid-related overdoses killed 870 Denverites, according to the Office of the Medical Examiner. The city says the crisis, “caused by defendants,” has hit nearly every corner of Denver’s government services.

“This crisis did not happen by accident, a press release from the mayor’s office states. “It was created by deliberate and systematic practices of pharmaceutical companies that, over approximately the last 20 years, provided false and misleading information to doctors and patients about the safety and effectiveness of prescription opioids.”

Drug manufacturers told doctors that the chance of addiction to opioid-based pain killers was very low and overcoming dependence would be simple, according to the complaint. They also touted prescription opioids as safe solutions for chronic pain without data, the complaint alleges.

A study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found neither of those claims were true, and is foundational to the complaint.

At the state level, Hancock and other mayors who filed the lawsuit Monday will likely have the support of Attorney General Phil Weiser. Last September, Weiser’s predecessor Cynthia Coffman sued Purdue Pharma for its alleged role in the opioid epidemic.

Similar to the municipal litigation, the state’s lawsuit against the pharmaceutical company Purdue Pharma cited “fraudulent and deceptive marketing” of prescription opioids in helping play a significant role in the opioid crisis. It claims Purdue violated the Colorado Consumer Protection Act.

Weiser said following his investiture ceremony last week he intends to support the state’s lawsuit and potentially add defendants. He even has plans for how to use potential settlement money.”

“The endgame there has to be that we’re going to get an amount of money that we can use to address the effects of this epidemic, which have been crippling across the state,” Weiser said. “I’ve seen them first-hand. We’re going to keep that as a top priority.”

Sixteen entities joined Denver in the lawsuit: Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Fremont, Larimer and Teller counties, Aurora, Black Hawk, Commerce City, Hudson, Northglenn, Westminster, and the Tri-County Health Department. Jefferson County and Thornton have filed similar but separate complaints.

Here are the defendants:

  • Purdue Pharma, L.P.
  • Purdue Pharma, Inc.
  • The Purdue Frederick Company, Inc.
  • Endo Health Solutions Inc.
  • Endo Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  • Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  • Johnson & Johnson;
  • Teva Pharmaceuticals Industries, Ltd.
  • Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc.
  • Cephalon, Inc.
  • Allergan plc formerly known as Actavis plc
  • Allergan Finance, LLC formerly known as Actavis, Inc. formerly known as Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  • Watson Laboratories, Inc.
  • Actavis, LLC
  • Actavis Pharma, Inc. formerly known as Watson Pharma, Inc
  • Mallinckrodt plc
  • Mallinckrodt, LLC
  • SpecGX, LLC
  • Cardinal Health, Inc.
  • McKesson Corporation
  • AmerisourceBergen Drug Corporation

Denverite reporter Esteban L. Hernandez contributed reporting to this story. 



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bjtitus
6 days ago
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Denver, CO
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A Year in Weather

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This is mesmerizing to watch for a few minutes: a time lapse map of weather activity across the entire US in 2018. I was thinking it would be instructive to see this sped up a bit more, that perhaps different patterns might reveal themselves, and then I remembered that you can control the playback speed on YouTube videos…just click the gear icon. I think I like the 2X version better. (via @DesignObserver)

Tags: maps   time lapse   video   weather
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bjtitus
9 days ago
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Denver, CO
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‘Just a French Guy Cooking’ by Alexis Gabriel Aïnouz

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If you like that Alex French Guy Cooking YouTube channel mentioned in this morning’s Linkage column, the charming guy behind it, Alexis Gabriel Aïnouz, has a cookbook of his own called Just a French Guy Cooking: Easy Recipes and Kitchen Hacks for Rookies that released back in September.

Alexis loves to demystify cooking by experimenting with food and cooking methods to take the fear factor out of cooking, make it fun and accessible, and charm everyone with his geeky approach to food.

In this, his debut cookbook, he shares 100 of his absolute favorite recipes – from amazingly tasty toast ideas all the way to some classic but super-simple French dishes. Along the way, he shares ingenious kitchen hacks – six ways with a can of sardines, a cheat’s guide to wine, three knives you need in your kitchen – so that anyone can throw together great food without any fuss.

In the book he brings his love for making cooking fun and easy, along with that irreverent je ne sais quoi that makes his videos so delightful to watch. And it’s not just that his personality shines here; he’s also assembled a unique mix of recipes from around the world that you very well may get your first introduction to (at least if you live here in the States and are an uncultured swine like me).

In this video, along with taking an adventure to a Parisian rooftop garden, he prepares the book’s first recipe: a version of shakshouka.

This is a very approachable cookbook for beginners, with plenty of geeky tips and hacks to please anyone’s inner mad (food) scientist. It’s even got a foreword by Jamie Oliver, which is a pretty good endorsement.

Get the cookbook in these formats:

Buy Now

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bjtitus
10 days ago
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Denver, CO
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Going Birdwatching in Red Dead Redemption 2

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Birding in Red Dead Redemption 2

For Audubon, avid birder Nicholas Lund writes about the experience of going birdwatching in the mega-popular Red Dead Redemption 2 game, set in the American West, circa 1899. The attention to detail and the number of species represented is impressive.

I spent most of my time finding birds, and was impressed with the breadth and relative accuracy of the species represented. Birds change with habitat: Roseate Spoonbills and Great Egrets feed in the bayous of Saint Denis. Laughing Gulls and Red-footed Boobies roost along the coast, while eagles and condors soar over mountain peaks. Each of these are crafted with accurate field marks and habits. There are dozens of species I couldn’t even find, including Carolina Parakeets, Ferruginous Hawks, and Pileated Woodpeckers. Like real life birding, you’re never guaranteed to see anything.

The sound design, too, is impressive. The landscape is alive with birdsong, including many species not actually in the game, like Northern Flicker and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. I was riding through a wooded area one time as dusk turned to night, and whip-poor-wills began singing out all around me.

But the game’s realistic portrayal of wildlife and its exploitation by humans causes Lund to reflect on how much destruction we’ve caused.

The demand for egret plumes for fancy hats was driving several species toward extinction. (Snowy Egret plumes can be sold in-game for $2.50 apiece.) Habitat loss and overhunting contributed to the extinction of the Carolina Parakeet soon after the game’s timeframe, in the early 20th century. (Carolina Parakeet flight feathers can be used to make far-flying arrows in the game.) The type of wanton destruction encouraged in Red Dead Redemption 2 is what led the National Audubon Society to lobby for, and Congress to pass, the real Migratory Bird Treaty Act in 1918, and other environmental legislation in the following decades.

Lund’s birding trip reminded me of other non-conventional uses of realistic video games by players: Jim Munroe being a tourist in Grand Theft Auto III and war photographer Ashley Gilbertson sending back photographs from the ultra-violent The Last of Us Remastered.

Tags: birds   Nicholas Lund   Red Dead Redemption   video games
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bjtitus
10 days ago
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Denver, CO
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