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Bob Clagett, Maker

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Our guest this week is Bob Clagett. Bob loves making stuff. He loves showing other people how he works to hopefully inspire them and empower them to make whatever is that they’re passionate about.

Subscribe to the Cool Tools Show on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page

Show notes:

Airtable
AirTable + IFTTT
“So Airtable is, like it was mentioned before, it’s kind of an online spreadsheet. And that’s one way that people use it. But the thing that makes it different for me and the way that I use it is more of a relational database. I come from a software background, so when you’re programming you often have a database of tables, and those tables need to relate to each other. … The way that I use that in my business is I have what looks like a spreadsheet that is my project schedule, and then I have a separate one that is project ideas that I come up with all the time and I just dump into this big list, and I use IFTTT for that. … IFTTT is about taking multiple online services of all different types and connecting them together. So if something happens on one, it can cause something to happen on another. And I use that with Airtable. The IFTTT app, I’ve got a little thing set up where I can open an app on my phone that’s just a text field and a button, and that’s all it is. And if I type in a project idea, and I hit that button, it disappears. It’s gone. But in the background it’s sending that to Airtable. It’s putting in my list of project ideas, and it just keeps it there, and then I don’t have to remember it anymore, but I also don’t lose it.”

hellonest
Nest Hello
“The Hello is a doorbell, which seems, for the price it sounds so unrealistic to actually get, because it’s several hundred dollars. But it’s an HD camera built into a tiny little doorbell, and it’s the same technology that they have in their security cameras … It’s small and kind of modern-looking and it hooks right up to the normal hookup for a doorbell. So you don’t have to really do anything special to get this in to place. And it’s got some really cool features. It’s very new, so I think some of the features that will be the coolest have yet to be added. But when you get it hooked up and someone walks up to your door, you get a notification on your phone or device or whatever that shows you video of the person who’s walked up to the door. And you can press a button onscreen, and you can talk to them remotely through the doorbell. It’s got some kind of canned responses that you can just press a button and this voice will say, “Just leave the package by the door,” there’s a few things like that. But one of the coolest things, I think, about it is that they’ve got some facial recognition stuff built in to it. So once it starts to take pictures, it gets this video of the people that come up to your door, and it keeps a log of all these pictures of the people.”

ISOtunes
ISOtunes Bluetooth Headphones
“They have basically the same features as far as listening that every other headphone in the world. But they have an interesting phone insert on them that you roll it up and you kind of heat it with your finger, between your thumb and your finger, and it squishes it down. And then when you put it in your ear it expands and completely fills the ear canal. So it cuts out basically all the noise that can come in. And the guy that works with me is maybe 10 feet from me right now, and I’ve yelled at the top of my voice his name to try to get his attention with these things in, and it completely blocks it out. But one of the things that I think is even color about them is that they have a, I can’t remember exactly what they call it, but it’s like a consistent noise level suppression. So if there’s a noise in the background, like if you had a saw running that was kind of the same noise the whole time or like a lawn mower or something, it can actively cut that sound out. So you can take a phone call while you’re on a riding lawn mower, and the person on the other end doesn’t really even know that there’s a mower running. They just hear when your voice spikes and things like that. That’s the part that they hear. And I have not heard of any other Bluetooth headphone that does that.”

Prusa3
Prusa i3 MK3 3D printer
“I’ve had several different 3D printers. I use them a lot for my projects. And I’m in a position where a lot of companies will send me things, and I get to try out really expensive things that I wouldn’t ever justified buying myself. But I have a lot of people who ask me about a good first printer. And I think the problem with that question is a lot of people are looking for a good first cheap printer. And what you actually want is a good printer, not a cheap printer, because cheap printers that don’t work very well are gonna make you hate 3D printing and think that it doesn’t work. And so when I’ve looked at a bunch of different ones from the perspective of cost and functionality and tried to find something in the middle, and I got the Prusa I3 Mark 2 a couple of years ago when it came out, and it was fantastic. It was like $699 for a printer that worked almost perfectly every single time right out of the box. You didn’t have to do anything to it, and it was a great printer, I was really happy with it. And then they announced this Mark 3, which is an upgraded version of the same thing. But they added all these features that just make it awesome. It’s now one of my favorite printers just because of its features. And then when you look at the price compared to a lot of other printers, it’s very, very reasonably priced for what you’re getting out of it. … It’s got a panic thing built in to it. So if it loses power, it has a little bit of a battery or capacitor in it somewhere that if it senses power dropping it will write the state of the print to some sort of a memory. And then when power is reapplied it’ll ask you, “Do you want to continue to print?” And you hit yes, and then it re-homes the print head, just goes over to the corner, and then comes right back and starts printing. It’s amazing. I’m sure there are other printers that do that, but I’ve never seen one, and it works great.”

Also mentioned:

Making Time by Bob Clagett

 
 
We have hired professional editors to help create our weekly podcasts and video reviews. So far, Cool Tools listeners have pledged $346 a month. Please consider supporting us on Patreon. We have great rewards for people who contribute! – MF

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bjtitus
6 hours ago
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Denver, CO
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Potential

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
I wonder if my kids will find these more upsetting than the weird sex comics.

New comic!
Today's News:

Signed editions now available!

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jlvanderzwan
2 days ago
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Yesterday, I happened to waste some time thinking about free will, and then that it more or less depends on what it really means to choose something, and then pondered the question of what a choice really is. I tried stripping out everything unnecessary and ask "could you define choice from a pure physics point of view, without anything personal attached to it?"

Then the following sentence bubbled up in my mind: "Choice is when out of all possible futures, one in particular happens"

And I thought.. "Wow... that sounds deep and means absolutely nothing"
vl
12 hours ago
Wow, man, that's deep...
bjtitus
21 hours ago
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Denver, CO
popular
2 days ago
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The Westworld season two soundtrack covers Kanye & Nirvana

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One of my favorite aspects of HBO’s Westworld is the music, particularly the acoustic covers of modern rock and pop songs, many of which sound like they could be coming from a player piano in the show’s Old West saloon. The first season’s soundtrack, composed by Ramin Djawadi, featured covers of songs by Radiohead, Amy Winehouse, and the Rolling Stones. The second season is starting in just a couple of weeks, but they’ve already released two new covers from this season’s soundtrack: Heart-Shaped Box by Nirvana and Kanye West’s Runaway.

Djawadi, perhaps best known as the composer of the Game of Thrones theme song, spoke to Pitchfork about the rationale behind the cover songs:

What I love about that is it just comes out of nowhere and you don’t expect it at all. You see the settings and the way people are dressed and even though you know it’s robots and it’s all made to be modern entertainment, you would think the people in control would make everything authentic, including whatever is played on that player piano. It would be from that time period. And when it’s not, it’s that subtle reminder that, ‘Wait, there is something not right. This is not real.’ It’s just such a powerful tool that only music can do.

Tags: Kanye West   music   Nirvana   Ramin Djawadi   TV   video   Westworld
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bjtitus
5 days ago
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Michael Borys, Interactive Design Director

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Our guest this week is Michael Borys. He is a designer who creates experiences for the entertainment industry. He is currently the Vice President of Interaction and Game Design at 42 Entertainment, a Magician Member of The Magic Castle and his immersive magic show is called The 49 Boxes — which is not to be missed.

Subscribe to the Cool Tools Show on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page

Show notes:

Bookofcodes
The Book of Codes
“It is a treasure trove of every single type of language that is used for encryption from the dawn of man to now. Of course, you’ve got braille and Morse and things like that. There’s even Klingon. It sort of teaches your brain to look at the world differently and see language in everything. For example, the way that binary works, as you know, it’s all ones and zeroes, and binary isn’t just on-off like that. It can be birds sitting on a fence, and if a bird has his wings up that could be a one, and if he’s got his wings down it can be a zero … Even a hem of a dress, if it has stitching that changes from time to time, you can embed information even with stitching that way. … I’m looking at Page 19, for example. It gives you versions of how information was decoded in the hems in garments during times of war, for example. And so across enemy lines … This is called steganography, by the way, the hiding of information. Soldiers were given information that were kept in their jackets. And so when they would go across enemy lines, if they were captured their capturers wouldn’t know that they actually had this information, but if they did get to where they needed to go the information could then be parsed, and that could win a war or lose a war. … hundreds and hundreds of these different ways of thinking that just become part of your rote memory, and so it makes you, as you travel, as you work, as you meet people and see things in a curio shop, you’ll realize that information is being hidden everywhere without anybody knowing it. It’s exciting, actually.”

puzzlekeyring
The Puzzle Keyring ($30)
“I wish I had this at every room escape that I tried to solve, because it’d be a tool to both to make puzzles, think about things differently, and to solve things really quickly. It’s great. … It is a plastic-coated booklet, so you can dump it in water, and it’d still be fine. Unrippable, and it’s on a metal keyring so that you can have it on your keys if you wanted to during the event. It’s too bulky to have it with you every day of your life, but, boy, is it convenient. It’s durable, and it’s very, very useful.”

blackdecker
BLACK+DECKER Impact Screwdriver ($60)
“Because my show travels, all my tools have to travel, and a lot of times I don’t have time to be delicate with the stuff that I have. This particular Black & Decker drill, I’ve charged it one time in two years, and darn it, it is great. Whenever I need it, it is ready. It had a light at the head of it. It seems unbreakable. I have a few different ones because I have a couple different sets of screws on many boxes that I have to undo and do during the show. This thing has been a lifesaver. You’re probably expecting, well, specialized tools, but this is the best drill I’ve ever had in my life. It was like 70 bucks, but again, it has fallen 20 feet to the ground and it’s never shattered, and it’s just always been there for me.”

maghand
Mag Hand Workstation
“That is the greatest for me because what this is is a platform that has magnetic trays — and it’s heavy, which is good — that I can keep the tiniest screws in and the tiniest washers, and because I’m always working with these tiny boxes and building things and making things tighter than what they probably were designed for, things fly all of the place, and how many times have you lost eyeglass screws? This thing, I can tip it upside down and all my screws and washers stay in one spot. I’ve knocked it on the ground and things have been fine. And there are also these posable arms with clips on the end of them, so if I’m ever painting something or I’m staining something that’s delicate, I don’t have the stain or the paint on my hands, because this thing will hold very objects in place for me so I won’t have to worry about that. It’s great. It’s a multipurpose thing that keeps me sane.”

Also mentioned:

Hidden Codes & Grand Designs

Locked by Jim Kleefeld

 
 

We have hired professional editors to help create our weekly podcasts and video reviews. So far, Cool Tools listeners have pledged $346 a month. Please consider supporting us on Patreon. We have great rewards for people who contribute! – MF

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bjtitus
7 days ago
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Ikea-style instructions for programming algorithms

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Ikea Algorithms

Ikea Algorithms

Ikea Algorithms

Sándor P. Fekete, Sebastian Morr, and Sebastian Stiller came up with these Ikea-style instructions for algorithms and data structures used in computer science. In addition to the three pictured above, there are also instructions for several other searches, trees, sorts, and scans.

Tags: Ikea   programming   remix
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bjtitus
7 days ago
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MeFi: What makes this song great?

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In his 'What Makes This Song Great' video series, musician and producer Rick Beato breaks down the musical structure and production techniques in popular songs. Working from the stems of each song, he discusses everything from Sting's Lydian mode bassline, to the use of Neumann mics to capture the intensity of Chris Cornell's vocals; from sidechain compression in an Ariana Grande song, to the use of a flat 6th to introduce a melancholy air in to the vocal melody of a Tool song. Beato's enthusiasm and breadth of knowledge are boundless, and whether or not you like the songs he analyzes, you're sure to learn something.

The 'What Makes This Song Great?' series so far:

1. Blink-182 - All the Small Things
2. The Police - Every Little Thing She Does is Magic
3. Steely Dan - Kid Charlemagne
4. Nirvana - On a Plain
5. Pearl Jam - Jeremy
6. Linkin Park - Numb
7. Tom Petty - I Won't Back Down
8. A Perfect Circle - Judith
9. Toto - Rosanna
10. Soundgarden - Spoonman
11. Metallica - Enter Sandman
13. Alice in Chains - Them Bones
14. Rage Against the Machine - Killing in the Name Of
15. Tool - Schism
16. Foo Fighters - Everlong
17. Boston - Hitch a Ride
18. (Producer) Max Martin - Into You by Ariana Grande (with a great discussion of sidechain compression)
19. Rush - Closer to the Heart

Bonus videos:

Analyzing the work of mixer Andy Wallace, including identifying the kick and snare samples and exact chorus setting (Yamaha SPX90 patch 15 'symphonic') that he used on multiple recordings.

His son, Dylan, has perfect pitch and is astonishing at identifying notes, intervals, and complex polychords.

Everything you ever wanted to know about compression.
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bjtitus
11 days ago
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