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anarchistettin: afunnyfeminist: whatareyoureallyafraidof:   Far...

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anarchistettin:

afunnyfeminist:

whatareyoureallyafraidof:

  Far too many people have short memories when it comes to the shit their side did.

White supremacists and police have never been asked to commit to nonviolence. That’s only ever been asked of victims.

That’s only ever been asked of victims.

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bjtitus
15 days ago
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Denver, CO
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toddgrotenhuis
9 days ago
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Earlier comment is true, but the latter is bullshit. They get asked to commit to nonviolence all the time. It just doesn't get serious response.
Indianapolis

Charging speed is no longer an obstacle for electric cars

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Porsche's Mission E

There’s a lot to learn about and ponder in this thread by Bloomberg Senior Reporter Tom Randall. He talks about how fast upcoming chargers will top up a battery, how larger capacity means quicker initial charges, extended ranges and more. (I only include a few tweets here, check out the whole thread.)

Obviously, electric cars aren’t perfect, you have to consider where the electricity is coming from, the production of batteries is polluting itself, and we should prioritize public transport and walkable / bikeable cities. Still, the speed at which renewables are being installed and the evolution of electric cars are a fascinating to watch.

Tags: cars
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bjtitus
18 days ago
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jepler
17 days ago
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OK, so I live in Nebraska which, if you don't have enough privilege to *fly* over it, you can still drive through it. Let's consider lowly Aurora, NE. Its population was under 5000 in 2016. I-80 passes about 2-3 miles south of it. In 2017, annual average daily traffic was 24201 vehicles, and the next places for gas are about 60 miles before and after it, so let's assume that 1/3 of the vehicles going by decide to fuel there instead of 60 miles further on (60/200 ~= 1/3).

You've got to accommodate 6000 vehicles per day at 10 minutes each. Actually, you can do that with a pretty manageable 42 charging stalls, if only vehicles were equally spaced through the whole day. Let's imagine that peak demand is double that, requiring 84 stalls, peak delivery of 29MW and average of 15MW. That's only about 6-12x the electricity used by all the ~1800 households in Aurora (2010 census figure), using a US average figure of 11968kWh/year!

(and now consider that many or even most of those 24k vehicles/day are of course semis with much higher battery capacities and lower "per mile" efficiency, once those are available)

This can serve as your daily reminder that, EV or gasoline, your personal automobile uses a HECK OF A LOT of power, and hydrocarbons are a great way to deliver that power to the point where it is needed ...except for all the problems with hydrocarbons, of course.
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm

15 Patents That Changed the World

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Brain implant patent illustration

Popular Mechanics has a quick look at 15 Patents That Changed the World, including the maglev train from back in 1967, the 3d printer, a “bionic eye” retinal prosthesis from 1968, GPS, CRISPR-Cas9, and graphene. Fun to read through but I’m including it here because it was found through Chris Anderson who had this comment:

Quadroptor patent illustration

Earlier today I tweeted this Boing Boing post about the upcoming US public domain infusion, the first since 1998. In the case of both patents and copyright, it’s important to remember the innovation and creativity their release provides, not just the original work or invention it represents.

Tags: copyright   patents
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bjtitus
20 days ago
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satadru
20 days ago
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American innovation happens when methods and patents enter the public domain because there's no RAND requirement for licensing, and people just don't want to deal with the hassle and legal fees otherwise.

Of course if you live in a country where that doesn't matter, like China, then you get a huge jump-start. (And of course this was the American paradigm through the 19th century.)
New York, NY

Philip Glass: “I expected to have a day job for the rest of my life”

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I enjoyed reading Lolade Fadulu’s interview with Philip Glass about the composer’s early life and how he made a living in NYC before being able to fully support himself with his music (which didn’t happen until he was in his early 40s). As a boy, his mother made sure he got a musical education and his job at his father’s record store exposed him to the idea that people paid money for art:

To this day, among my earliest memories was someone would give my father $5 and he’d hand them a record. So the exchange of money for art, I thought that was normal. I thought that’s what everybody did. I never thought there was anything wrong about making money.

As an adult, Glass worked odd jobs (plumber, mover, cab driver) to have the independence to work on his music:

I had an ensemble at the time. I would go out and play for three weeks. We would come back from the tour, and we usually had lost money so I had to make money immediately. I put an ad in the paper. My cousin and I ran the company, and I moved furniture for about three or four or five weeks. Then I went on tour again. Again, we lost money.

That went on for years. I thought it was going to go on for the rest of my life, actually. It never occurred to me that I would be able to make a living, really, from writing music. That happened kind of by accident.

I was interested in jobs that were part-time, where I had a lot of independence, where I could work when I wanted to. I wasn’t interested in working in an office where everything would be very regimented.

As his musical career took off, Glass continued to take his other work seriously. From a 2001 profile of Glass in The Guardian:

Throughout this period, Glass supported himself as a New York cabbie and as a plumber, occupations that often led to unusual encounters. “I had gone to install a dishwasher in a loft in SoHo,” he says. “While working, I suddenly heard a noise and looked up to find Robert Hughes, the art critic of Time magazine, staring at me in disbelief. ‘But you’re Philip Glass! What are you doing here?’ It was obvious that I was installing his dishwasher and I told him I would soon be finished. ‘But you are an artist,’ he protested. I explained that I was an artist but that I was sometimes a plumber as well and that he should go away and let me finish.”

But after Einstein on the Beach dazzled critics at the Metropolitan Opera, Glass’s days in the driver’s seat of a cab were limited:

The day after the performance, Glass was back driving his taxi: “I vividly remember the moment, shortly after the Met adventure,” he says, “when a well-dressed woman got into my cab. After noting the name of the driver, she leaned forward and said: ‘Young man, do you realise you have the same name as a very famous composer’.”

Glass is my favorite composer, but as much as I love his music, I might appreciate the way he has approached his work and career almost as much.

Tags: interviews   Lolade Fadulu   music   NYC   Philip Glass   working
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bjtitus
25 days ago
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Denver, CO
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Bob Clagett, Maker

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Our guest this week is Bob Clagett. Bob loves making stuff. He loves showing other people how he works to hopefully inspire them and empower them to make whatever is that they’re passionate about.

Subscribe to the Cool Tools Show on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page

Show notes:

Airtable
AirTable + IFTTT
“So Airtable is, like it was mentioned before, it’s kind of an online spreadsheet. And that’s one way that people use it. But the thing that makes it different for me and the way that I use it is more of a relational database. I come from a software background, so when you’re programming you often have a database of tables, and those tables need to relate to each other. … The way that I use that in my business is I have what looks like a spreadsheet that is my project schedule, and then I have a separate one that is project ideas that I come up with all the time and I just dump into this big list, and I use IFTTT for that. … IFTTT is about taking multiple online services of all different types and connecting them together. So if something happens on one, it can cause something to happen on another. And I use that with Airtable. The IFTTT app, I’ve got a little thing set up where I can open an app on my phone that’s just a text field and a button, and that’s all it is. And if I type in a project idea, and I hit that button, it disappears. It’s gone. But in the background it’s sending that to Airtable. It’s putting in my list of project ideas, and it just keeps it there, and then I don’t have to remember it anymore, but I also don’t lose it.”

hellonest
Nest Hello
“The Hello is a doorbell, which seems, for the price it sounds so unrealistic to actually get, because it’s several hundred dollars. But it’s an HD camera built into a tiny little doorbell, and it’s the same technology that they have in their security cameras … It’s small and kind of modern-looking and it hooks right up to the normal hookup for a doorbell. So you don’t have to really do anything special to get this in to place. And it’s got some really cool features. It’s very new, so I think some of the features that will be the coolest have yet to be added. But when you get it hooked up and someone walks up to your door, you get a notification on your phone or device or whatever that shows you video of the person who’s walked up to the door. And you can press a button onscreen, and you can talk to them remotely through the doorbell. It’s got some kind of canned responses that you can just press a button and this voice will say, “Just leave the package by the door,” there’s a few things like that. But one of the coolest things, I think, about it is that they’ve got some facial recognition stuff built in to it. So once it starts to take pictures, it gets this video of the people that come up to your door, and it keeps a log of all these pictures of the people.”

ISOtunes
ISOtunes Bluetooth Headphones
“They have basically the same features as far as listening that every other headphone in the world. But they have an interesting phone insert on them that you roll it up and you kind of heat it with your finger, between your thumb and your finger, and it squishes it down. And then when you put it in your ear it expands and completely fills the ear canal. So it cuts out basically all the noise that can come in. And the guy that works with me is maybe 10 feet from me right now, and I’ve yelled at the top of my voice his name to try to get his attention with these things in, and it completely blocks it out. But one of the things that I think is even color about them is that they have a, I can’t remember exactly what they call it, but it’s like a consistent noise level suppression. So if there’s a noise in the background, like if you had a saw running that was kind of the same noise the whole time or like a lawn mower or something, it can actively cut that sound out. So you can take a phone call while you’re on a riding lawn mower, and the person on the other end doesn’t really even know that there’s a mower running. They just hear when your voice spikes and things like that. That’s the part that they hear. And I have not heard of any other Bluetooth headphone that does that.”

Prusa3
Prusa i3 MK3 3D printer
“I’ve had several different 3D printers. I use them a lot for my projects. And I’m in a position where a lot of companies will send me things, and I get to try out really expensive things that I wouldn’t ever justified buying myself. But I have a lot of people who ask me about a good first printer. And I think the problem with that question is a lot of people are looking for a good first cheap printer. And what you actually want is a good printer, not a cheap printer, because cheap printers that don’t work very well are gonna make you hate 3D printing and think that it doesn’t work. And so when I’ve looked at a bunch of different ones from the perspective of cost and functionality and tried to find something in the middle, and I got the Prusa I3 Mark 2 a couple of years ago when it came out, and it was fantastic. It was like $699 for a printer that worked almost perfectly every single time right out of the box. You didn’t have to do anything to it, and it was a great printer, I was really happy with it. And then they announced this Mark 3, which is an upgraded version of the same thing. But they added all these features that just make it awesome. It’s now one of my favorite printers just because of its features. And then when you look at the price compared to a lot of other printers, it’s very, very reasonably priced for what you’re getting out of it. … It’s got a panic thing built in to it. So if it loses power, it has a little bit of a battery or capacitor in it somewhere that if it senses power dropping it will write the state of the print to some sort of a memory. And then when power is reapplied it’ll ask you, “Do you want to continue to print?” And you hit yes, and then it re-homes the print head, just goes over to the corner, and then comes right back and starts printing. It’s amazing. I’m sure there are other printers that do that, but I’ve never seen one, and it works great.”

Also mentioned:

Making Time by Bob Clagett

 
 
We have hired professional editors to help create our weekly podcasts and video reviews. So far, Cool Tools listeners have pledged $346 a month. Please consider supporting us on Patreon. We have great rewards for people who contribute! – MF

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bjtitus
30 days ago
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Denver, CO
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Potential

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
I wonder if my kids will find these more upsetting than the weird sex comics.

New comic!
Today's News:

Signed editions now available!

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jlvanderzwan
32 days ago
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Yesterday, I happened to waste some time thinking about free will, and then that it more or less depends on what it really means to choose something, and then pondered the question of what a choice really is. I tried stripping out everything unnecessary and ask "could you define choice from a pure physics point of view, without anything personal attached to it?"

Then the following sentence bubbled up in my mind: "Choice is when out of all possible futures, one in particular happens"

And I thought.. "Wow... that sounds deep and means absolutely nothing"
vl
30 days ago
Wow, man, that's deep...
jlvanderzwan
29 days ago
Maybe, I don't know if is useful for anything beyond sounding deep though
bjtitus
30 days ago
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Denver, CO
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32 days ago
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